Dow AgroSciences Career as a Field Scientist

Above: Left, Alejandro Calixto, Right, Joe Egher, share their career paths and wisdom regarding becoming and performing the job of a field scientist in industry. I thought Joe and Alejandro did an amazing job talking to our group about industry. Their personal career paths and perspective provided an unique opportunity…
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Syngenta Career Day at the Vero Beach Research Station

Above: Our group on the field trial site visit portion of the trip. Here we discussed field experimental design and the importance of understanding specific crop practices when developing relevant protocols. Thank you again to Bryan Delp, James Hadden, and all of the researchers at Syngenta VRBC for taking the…
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Career Focus: Plant Disease Diagnostician, Carrie Harmon UF IFAS

Plant Disease Clinic Thank you again to Carrie Harmon for the informative workshop on economically important plant diseases in Florida. During the workshop, Dr. Harmon gave us a tour of the UF plant disease clinic, including their biosecure room. She also explained in detail what it is like to work…
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Career Day at Dow AgroSciences

Our group of 21 University of Georgia students along with our hosts (Ronda Hamm, Javier Delgado, Carla Klittich, Jerry Watson) outside of the Dow AgroSciences global headquarters in Zionsville, IN.
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Preparing to make the world a better place through science

Picture above: Our students in front of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ monument in Indianapolis, IN One final reflection on our trip. We as agricultural scientists collectively carry with us an enormous responsibility to serve our clients. Why is this an enormous responsibility? Simply put, our clients are everyone on our…
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Crop Development: Growing corn and soybeans in Indiana

Picture Above: Another wonderful example of the many demonstration plots at the Beck Agricultural Center. These large plots are only used for demonstration purposes and are one of the many reasons that his facility is so unique. Dr. John Obermeyer (picture above), Integrated Pest Management Specialist at Purdue University, speaking…
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Weed management and Chemical Stewardship: Drift Reduction

During his talk on “Maximizing Weed Control While Minimizing Herbicide Drift” Travis Legleiter, Weed Science Professional Assistant at Purdue University, used this awesome modified boom demonstration spray table to highlight the effect of pressure and spray tip design on drift potential. Be sure to notice the slight fog forming over…
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Insect Identification and Management

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We are all inside the soybean pest demonstration screenhouse. Typically a screenhouse is used to keep pests out but this one is used to keep pests in. The idea is to trap all of the crop pests and beneficial predators in one space and observe the population dynamics over the course of the growing season. Dr. Krupke highlighted the fact that during the season you usually are able to observe predator-prey dynamics. By this I mean that over the course of the season you will first observe an exponential increase in pest numbers as they feed on the crop (soybean in the picture) and produce more offspring. This increase in the number of pests  is then followed by an equally large increase in the predators of these insects which then causes a large decrease in crop pest numbers. In summary, the experiment set up in the screenhouse demonstrates that when all other aspects of crop stress are controlled natural predator-prey relationships are able to keep insect pests at moderately low levels.
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